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© 2019 Voice 21  |  Voice 21 operates as an organisation under the School 21 Foundation, a registered charity in England and Wales, registration number 1152672 | Company no. 08165798 |

Voice 21 is a campaign to raise the status of oracy in schools across the UK & get talking in class. 

All our work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, unless it says otherwise. 

What is oracy?

Learning to talk well and learning well through talk 

Oracy is to speech what literacy is to writing and numeracy is to maths. Its analogy to literacy and numeracy emphasises it's equal educational significance. 

Much like good literacy and numeracy, good oracy is achieved through teaching and cultivating a set of core skills. 

We've categorised these skills into four strands: linguistic, physical, cognitive and social & emotional to help students and teachers recognise what elements support good talk. 

Oracy also supports learning. Through debating, discussing and deliberating over ideas students are cognitively stretched and challenged to formulate their own opinions and come to shared decisions. Moreover, it is also fundamental to supporting the development of reading and writing skills. 

The Oracy Venn 

Oracy can be described as the sweet spot in the overlap between learning to talk and learning through talk

Four Strands 

Oracy is to speech what literacy is to writing and numeracy is to maths. Its analogy to literacy and numeracy emphasises it's equal educational significance. 

Much like good literacy and numeracy, good oracy is achieved through teaching and cultivating a set of core skills. 

We've categorised these skills into four strands: linguistic, physical, cognitive and social & emotional to help students and teachers recognise what elements support good talk. 

Oracy also supports learning. Through debating, discussing and deliberating over ideas students are cognitively stretched and challenged to formulate their own opinions and come to shared decisions. Moreover, it is also fundamental to supporting the development of reading and writing skills. 

Learning through & to

Oracy can be described as the sweet spot in the overlap between learning to talk and learning through talk